Quantum Chromodynamics

As per quantum physics attempted to enlarge into the nucleus of the atom, new strategies were required. The quantum theory of the atomic nucleus, and the particles that make it up, is called quantum chromodynamics (QCD). String theory arose out of an attempt to explain this same behavior. QED attempted to simplify the situation by only analyzing two aspects of the atom — the photon and the electron — which it could do by treating the nucleus as a giant, very distant object. The laws of subatomic physics dictate that individual quarks are never seen in the wild; they always travel around in twos or threes. At sufficiently high temperatures, however—such as those reached in a high-energy particle collider—protons and neutrons are thought to disintegrate into a soup, or plasma, of individual quarks and gluons, before cooling and recombining into ordinary matter. The small building blocks are antiquarks and quarks, in which all the stuff is built, binding together to form neutrons and protons in a procedure explained by quantum chromodynamics. Currently, scientists are searching for the existence of mesons that don't fit the traditional patterns. If a meson is found to weigh more than predictable, something else must be going on. Scientists call these hypothetical particles exotic mesons and believe that gluons play an important role in their structure.

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